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A specific protein called TEAD1 is an important regulator of tumor migration in glioblastoma, the most common brain tumor in adults, and deactivating this protein may stop tumor cells from migrating away from the main tumor mass, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 1 in the journal Nature Communications. The data garnered through this study may help increase the success rate and overall survival time after surgery for patients who are afflicted with this devastating form of tumor.

Glioblastoma carries a dismal prognosis, despite aggressive treatment. One of the main reasons glioblastoma cannot be cured is because of the tumor’s unusual ability to rapidly crawl and spread through the patient’s brain, a property referred to as “migration” or “infiltration.” While many chemotherapy drugs can stop tumor cells from multiplying, treatment options to stop tumor cells from migrating do not yet exist. The diffusely infiltrative nature of glioblastoma tumor growth is a challenge for surgical therapy because infiltrative cells inevitably extend beyond the margin of apparently non-tumorous tissue around a tumor mass that has been surgically removed. Because the intrinsic biology of these cells is poorly understood and their movement

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