Study explores satisfaction, quality of life after breast reconstruction
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Boston, MA — More than 60 percent of women who undergo a mastectomy to treat breast cancer choose breast reconstruction, and the demand for that surgery is rising. However, due to the previous lack of evidence-based, patient-centered data available about post-breast reconstruction, most patients aren’t properly informed about satisfaction and quality-of-life measures over time.

In a new study, building on the previous one-year, patient-reported outcomes of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC), researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital evaluated patient-reported satisfaction and well-being outcomes prior to, and two years after their initial surgery for more than 2,000 women across the United States. These women received either autologous – or “flap” breast reconstruction, which uses skin, fat or muscle from elsewhere in the body to rebuild the breast – or implant-based breast reconstruction.

Researchers found that patients who underwent autologous reconstruction had greater satisfaction with their breasts, as well as a greater psychosocial and sexual well-being two years after surgery, than did those who underwent implant reconstruction. Results are published in JAMA Surgery on June 20.

“Patient-centered data can best inform patients and clinicians about the potential risks and expected outcomes of breast reconstruction when making a decision between implant-based

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