Study holds promise for new pediatric brain tumor treatment
Share

SALT LAKE CITY – New research published in Nature Communications from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U), in collaboration with the Stanford University School of Medicine, shows a specific protein regulates both the initiation of cancer spreading and the self-renewal of cancer cells in medulloblastoma, a type of pediatric brain cancer.

Among children’s cancers, brain cancer has the highest mortality for children, with medulloblastoma being one of the most common brain tumors in children. Medulloblastoma usually develops at the base of the brain and spreads through the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to the spinal cord or other parts of the brain.

“When medulloblastoma spreads, it’s much harder to treat and in many cases is incurable,” said the study lead, Samuel Cheshier, MD, PhD, cancer researcher at HCI and associate professor of neurosurgery at the U of U. “The need to understand medulloblastoma and how it spreads is incredibly important in order to know how to treat the cancer and find how to stop the disease from spreading, or metastasizing.”

To learn more about the metastasis of medulloblastoma, the research team gathered samples from patients that included a brain tumor sample and

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD