Study paves the way for better treatment of prostate cancer
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A new study published today has found a way to identify men with locally advanced prostate cancer who are less likely to respond well to radiotherapy.

Led by Professor Catharine West, The University of Manchester team created a method of selecting prostate cancer patients who would benefit from treatments which target oxygen deficient tumours.

The study was funded by Prostate Cancer UK and NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre and published in eBiomedicine today.

Tumour hypoxia is associated with a poor prognosis in prostate cancer: the lower the oxygen, the greater the resistance to treatment and the more likely a tumour will spread.

The researchers identified a 28-gene signature, which accurately identifies hypoxic tumour tissue in patients with prostate cancer which invades nearby structures

The signature was derived using analysis of human cells in the lab and patient survival data.

The signature was validated using data from across the world in eleven prostate cancer cohorts and a bladder cancer phase III randomized trial of radiotherapy.

According to cancer.net, the 5-year survival rate for most men with local prostate cancer is almost 100%. 98% are alive after 10 years, and 96% live for at least 15 years.

For men diagnosed with

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Article originally posted at
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