Tackling tumour scar tissue could be key to treating pancreatic cancer
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The research, led by Queen Mary University of London, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, Beaujon University Hospital (INSERM), Paris, and Barts Health NHS Trust, could lead to tailor-made treatments, including immunotherapies, which target the powerful scar tissue wall that protects the cancer and makes it such a difficult disease to treat.

Co-lead researcher Professor Hemant Kocher from Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust, said: “We are excited to uncover new potential targets for treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer. Scar tissue is a huge barrier in treating pancreatic cancer, where it can form up to 90 per cent of the tumour volume, but it is still so poorly understood.

“Our ongoing mission is to fully understand how the scar tissue influences cancer behaviour so that we can develop more effective treatments for patients with this disease, where sadly very few are successful.”

Each year around 9,800 people in the UK are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Scar tissue is a particular problem in the disease, where it forms the largest proportion of tumour volume out of any type of cancer.

The intense scar tissue forms a protective wall around the cancer, hampering treatments including chemotherapy,

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