Part III of III in a series on the evolution of aging. (Part I, Part II) Part IPart II If all you had to go on was our genomes, you’d surely conclude that humans and rodents were nearly the same animal, with roughly 92% overlap. And luckily for the species that does science, the other…

Ever hear about an exciting discovery in the biomedical world, then later wonder why it seemingly dropped off the face of the Earth? In fact, it’s par for the course for potential therapeutics to fail before they ever get off the ground, guided unwittingly by their enthusiastic champions straight into a boneyard strewn with the…

In biomedical science, rodents are the old stalwarts: they’re cheap, easy to care for, have lives short enough to allow us to observe them over the course of a couple of years, and it’s fairly easy to produce a population of mice with whatever sort of genetic mutation we could want. But while they’re at…

It looks like those clumps of tau protein that form inside the neurons of Alzheimer’s brains may actually be protective, and the real damage might instead come from tau oligomers. If you take a major flesh wound to the emergency room for treatment, they probably won’t slather a metformin cream on you… but maybe they…

“All of this time I had been thinking about telomere maintenance in terms of the minuscule cellular molecular structures that they are, and the genes that control telomeres. When Elissa posed her question, however, I suddenly saw telomeres in a whole new light. I saw how they impacted the lives of real people.” More of…

Laboratories studying the biology of aging are a menagerie of creatures great and small. From unicellular yeast and nematodes, all the way up to primates and even the faithful old Canis familiaris, animal models have opened up the aging process to our inspection in ways that human subjects wouldn’t have been able to match. It’s…

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