TGen-led study finds potent anti-cancer drug effect in rare ovarian cancer
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PHOENIX, Ariz. — March 1, 2018 — An anti-cancer drug used to fight leukemia shows promise against a rare and aggressive type of ovarian cancer — small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) — which strikes young women and girls, according to a study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Ponatinib was found in TGen-led drug screens and preclinical studies to significantly delay tumor growth and reduce tumor volume in SCCOHT, according to the study published online in the scientific journal Clinical Cancer Research. The findings suggest that ponatinib should be tested for use in SCCOHT patients in clinical trials.

The statistics for SCCOHT are bleak. This rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer has been diagnosed in women as old as 47, and as young as 14 months, with a median diagnosis of only 24 years of age. It has a dismal two-year survival rate of less than 35 percent.

“Current treatment for this devastating cancer has such poor response rates and extreme toxicity that we must find better therapeutics,” said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director, and the senior author of the study. “Our work identifies a new treatment strategy that

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