Thirdhand smoke found to increase lung cancer risk in mice
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IMAGE: Thirdhand smoke contains the chemicals in secondhand smoke from a cigarette that are deposited on indoor surfaces. Some of these chemicals interact with molecules from the air to create a… view more 

Credit: Antoine Snijders, Jian-Hua Mao, and Bo Hang/Berkeley Lab

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) identified thirdhand smoke, the toxic residues that linger on indoor surfaces and in dust long after a cigarette has been extinguished, as a health hazard nearly 10 years ago. Now a new study has found that it also increases lung cancer risk in mice.

A team led by Antoine Snijders, Jian-Hua Mao, and Bo Hang of Berkeley Lab first reported in 2017 that brief exposure to thirdhand smoke is associated with low body weight and immune changes in juvenile mice. In a follow-up study published recently in Clinical Science, the researchers and their team have determined that early thirdhand smoke exposure is also associated with increased incidence and severity of lung cancer in mice.

Field studies in the U.S. and China have confirmed that the presence of thirdhand smoke in indoor environments is widespread, and traditional cleaning methods are not effective at removing it. Because

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