Thousands of breast cancer gene variants engineered and analyzed
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VIDEO: Dr. Jay Shendure and Dr. Lea Starita at the University of Washington Department of Genome Sciences and the Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine talk about the findings from engineering… view more 

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A new scientific analysis of nearly 4,000 mutations deliberately engineered into the BRCA1 gene will immediately benefit people undergoing genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk.

The study will be published in the Sept. 12 edition of the scientific journal, Nature. Additional data from the research has been made available online.

Jay Shendure and Lea Starita, faculty in the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine, are the senior authors. Shendure directs the Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine in Seattle, which helped support the study. Starita co-directs the Brotman Baty Advanced Technology Lab. Shendure is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

Greg Findlay, an M.D./Ph.D. student in the physician-scientist training program at the UW medical school, led the study, which is entitled, “Accurate classification of BRCA1 variants with saturation genome editing.”

The BRCA1 gene suppresses tumors, but the exact mechanisms by which is does this are not fully understood. Certain mutations in the gene are known to predispose women

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