Three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs
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CHICAGO – Spending on cancer drugs in the United States has nearly doubled in the past five years and continues to grow, imposing substantial financial burden on patients with cancer. One of the biggest drivers of this growth is targeted cancer drugs – small molecules, monoclonal antibodies, and other therapies for cancer that target specific genomic aberrations. Now, a group led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania has proposed three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs. The recommendations were published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Lead author, Justin E. Bekelman, MD, an associate professor of Radiation Oncology and member of Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center, will also discuss the recommendations today in a major symposium at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in Chicago (Session SY04).

To consider potential solutions, the University of Pennsylvania convened the Gant Consortium, a multidisciplinary group of experts and stakeholders from cancer medicine, patient advocacy, insurance and pharmaceutical companies, and health care economics, policy, law, and regulation, co-chaired by Bekelman. On the basis of these discussions, the authors propose three principal solutions:

“The remarkable national commitment to cancer research, and the

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